Antrim Shale, Michigan Basin

The Antrim Shale was one of the first economic shale gas plays in the U.S. and has been actively produced since the 1980’s. While previous studies suggest co-produced water in the Antrim is a mixture of brine from deeper formations and freshwater recharge, the extent of water-gas interactions has yet to be determined. The extent and source of thermogenic methane in the Antrim Shale remains also ill constrained. This study uses stable noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) isotopic ratios and volume fractions from the Antrim Shale gas to assess compositional variability and vertical fluid migration, in addition to distinguishing between the presence of thermogenic versus biogenic methane.

This work is being done in collaboration with our colleagues Brian Ellis from the Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) Department at UM and Kyger Lohmann also at the Earth and Environmental Sciences Department at UM.

It is being funded by the MCubed program at UM.

Publications:

Wen T, M. C. Castro, B. Ellis, C. M. Hall, and K. C. Lohmann (2015), Assessing the Compositional Variability and Migration of Natural Gas in the Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin Using Noble Gas Geochemistry, 10.1016/j.chemgeo.2015.10.029, Chemical Geology.

T. Wen, M. C. Castro, B. Ellis, C. M. Hall, K. C. Lohmann and L. Bouvier (2015), Assessing the Compositional Variability and Migration of Natural Gas in Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin Using Noble Gas Geochemistry, AAPG ACE meeting; 2015 May 31-June 3; Denver, CO.

Sampling the Antrim Shale. Field trips December 2013 and October 2014. Brian Ellis (CEE), Tao Wen and Laura Bouvier (EES) and Phil Brenz (Chemical Engineering)
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M. Clara Castro,
Jan 8, 2017, 6:17 AM